Search
  • Infrastructure Exchange

KRB considers alternative funding and construction materials review



Slightly more than 50% of the total road network in Kenya can be classified as good or fair, according to a new audit. The total road network, spanning both national and rural roads, was recently audited and while the results of the audit show a significant improvement on 2009 results, they indicate that only 57% of the roads could be classified as either good or fair.


According to the Kenya Roads Board (KRB): “A bigger percentage of the unpaved county network is either poor or very poor, indicating the need for more resource allocation to upgrade the roads.”

It is estimated that the annual maintenance estimate annually is Sh70 billion – and this excludes maintenance backlogs.

While it is anticipated the annual fuel levy's will provide 68.996 billion for maintenance, the amount is "still inadequate for road maintenance given that [the] backlog in maintenance has not been addressed fully, and that a total of Sh11.18 billion will be allocated to the Road Annuity Fund,” KRB said.

"a detailed review of road construction materials with the view of recommending cost-effective materials for road development and maintenance."

KRB is therefore having to consider alternative road maintenance financing mechanisms such as "long-term infrastructure bonds, public private partnerships, introducing levies on motor vehicle insurance and annual licences, and levies on outdoor advertisements," according to the Business Daily Africa.

Such efforts could account for an additional Sh60 billion annually.

The KRB is also "undertaking a detailed review of road construction materials with the view of recommending cost-effective materials for road development and maintenance.

“Other potential savings are expected to be realised from revised road construction specifications and contract documents,” according to the KRB.

Roads transport is responsible for more than 95% of all freight and passenger traffic in Kenya